6: Ladyes Piller
longways for as many as you please
mms pages 9 and 10
Playford version: from 1st to 8th editions.
Music: my own creation
Part 1
Verse 1, Part A
1: Lead up [a double]
2: [Fall back a double]
3-4: Set [and turn left]
Verse 1, Part B
The verse instructions are trailed by this intriguing instruction "once, or twice" - I suppose it's perfectly okay for the musicians not to play the A part twice if they don't want to! But assuming they do:
1: Lead up [a double]
2: [Fall back a double]
3-4: Set [and turn right]
Chorus 1, Part A
1-2: Everyone do a quarter-turn to their right so that the men face down and the women face up. Then do two doubles to separate and then arc, men right, women left, to end up perpendicular to the starting position and a ways apart and to the left
3-4: Set [and turn left]
Chorus 1, Part B
1-2: Take two doubles to change places with your partner, ending up a normal distance apart and facing them at the end (still perpendicular: "in the breadth the room")
3-4: Set [and turn right]
Chorus 1, Part C
1-4: Man 1 takes is partner by the left hand and leads her through all the rest, and then up into their original starting places. Everyone else follows, and the dancers will end up in their "right places" by the end.
Part 2
Verse 2, Part A
1-2: Side [left to line up right shoulders]
3-4: Set [and turn left]
Verse 2, Part B
Unlike before, we are explicitly told to "sides all twice, and sett twice"
1-2: Side [right to line up left shoulders]
3-4: Set [and turn right]
Chorus 2, Part A
"the woemen come upwards, and the men doe goe downwards, contrary to that afforesad". Since women going up and men going down is what the previous instructions said, perhaps they should end up on the 'contrary' side instead:
1-2: Everyone do a quarter-turn to their right so that the women face up and the men face down. Then do two doubles to separate and then arc, men *left*, women *right*, to end up perpendicular to the starting position and a ways apart and to the right of it
3-4: Set [and turn left]
Chorus 1, Part B
1-2: Take two doubles to change places with your partner, ending up a normal distance apart and facing them at the end
3-4: Set [and turn right]
Chorus 1, Part C
1-4: Woman 1 takes her partner by the right hand and leades him through all the rest, and then up into their original starting places. Everyone else follows, and they all "come into their places agayne"
Part 3
After the separator, the part 3 instructions are: "Doe the first over agayne":
Verse 3, Part A
1: Lead up [a double]
2: [Fall back a double]
3-4: Set [and turn left]
Verse 3, Part B
1: Lead up [a double]
2: [Fall back a double]
3-4: Set [and turn right]
Chorus 3, Part A
1-2: Everyone do a quarter-turn to their right so that the men face down and the women face up. Then do two doubles to separate and then arc, men right, women left, to end up perpendicular to the starting position and a ways apart and to the left
3-4: Set [and turn left]
Chorus 3, Part B
1-2: Take two doubles to change places with your partner, ending up a normal distance apart and facing them at the end
3-4: Set [and turn right]
Chorus 3, Part C
1-4: Man 1 takes is partner by the left hand and leads her through all the rest, and then up into their original starting places. Everyone else follows, and the dancers will end up back where they started by the end.
Comparison to the Playford version (version 1, 1st to 8th editions)
Basically, these are the same dances. The chief difference is in the mechanism of the whole set of dancers moving, and the results thereof.
In Playford's version (which in the contents of the 1st edition is called "Lady Spillers"), everyone simply does two doubles "all to the left, cross the room", rather than the uping and downing and arcing.
So, the result is that the line does not turn perpendicular, but it ends up essentially the same. The difference in placement also dictates a different way of returning to the start, but again - not fundamentally different.
The Playford version has each chorus being identical (using the "as before" marker), which equates with this version despite the different wording in the 2nd part that ends up being exactly the same.
Lastly, we have the possibility that the last verse is once again leading up and back, rather than arming - not a huge difference, though it may well add fuel to the "assumption of USA verses" fire.
Conclusion:
Easily equivalent, and can quite well be done to the same music (if only there were any recordings available )
As an extra note, we have here the first instance of trying to equate "set" in Lovelace with "set and turn" in Playford - if we use the same music, we have to either stretch setting to take two measures, or assume setting and turning when this is used in a verse (and, in this case, the chorus as well).