23: Harts ease
for only 4 in a square, facing
mms pages 46 and 47
Playford version: from 1st edition to 8th edition.
Music: many
Part 1
Verse 1, Part A
1: Lead forward [a double]
2: Fall back [a double]
Verse 1, Part B
1: Lead forward [a double]
2: Fall back [a double]
Chorus 1, Part A
1: Fall back [a double]
2: Come forwards again [a double]
3-4: Turn your partner all the way around
Chorus 1, Part B
1: Fall back [a double]
2: Come forwards again [a double]
3-4: Turn your opposite all the way around
Part 2
Verse 2, Part A
1-2: Side [left to line up right shoulders]
Verse 2, Part B
1-2: Side [right to line up left shoulders]
Chorus 2, Part A
1: Fall back [a double]
2: Come forwards again [a double]
3-4: Turn your opposite all the way around
Chorus 2, Part B
1: Fall back [a double]
2: Come forwards again [a double]
3-4: Turn your partner all the way around
Part 3
Verse 3, Part A
1-2: Arm [left (right arms, walk left)]
Verse 3, Part B
1-2: Arm [right (left arms, walk right)]
Chorus 3, Part A
1: Fall back [a double]
2: Come forwards again [a double]
3-4: Turn your partner all the way around
Chorus 3, Part B
1: Fall back [a double]
2: Come forwards again [a double]
3-4: Turn your opposite all the way around
Comparison to the Playford version (1st to 8th editions)
Again, a simpler version of the Playford classic, without the verse changups of siding/arming with your partner, then your opposite (though this move is represented elsewhere in this manuscript), and with the addition of the chorus switching who gets turned first - another occurrence of this switchup in this mms
Also of note:
The description of the second part in total is quite confusing, and I find it interesting (in a nerdy way) that the 1st edition Playford is similarly confusing, though in the 1st part, not 2nd part. I can, with some creative reading, see how this manuscript's description of part 2 ends up being what I've written above,
but I can also see how it might get interpreted in a vastly different way