25: Greenwood
for 6 only, longways, with the middle couple improper (reversed)
mms pages 51 to 53
Playford version: from 1st edition to 8th edition.
Music: John Playford's Popular Tunes by the Broadside Band (part of a medley, as so often happens )
The Playford version of the music required 22 repeats of the single-strain music. This version only needs between 10 and maybe 14 repeats.
Part 1
Verse 1, Part A
1: Lines facing partners and holding hands, lead [a double] toward each other
2: Fall back [a double], drop hands
3: Man 2 and woman 2 will each congee (bow) to the person on their right
4: Man 2 and woman 2 will each congee (bow) to the person on their left, and then everyone will turn their back on their partner (in no time)
Verse 1, Part B
1: Lines holding hands, go [a double] away from each other
2: Fall back [a double], drop hands
3: Man 2 and woman 2 will each congee (bow) to the person on their left
4: Man 2 and woman 2 will each congee (bow) to the person on their right, and then everyone turn to face their partner again (in no time)
Note: considering the way that the turning your back on your partner is noted ("then all turne halfe round with their faces from each other", and similar to face again), the congeeing may all take 1 measure (2 beats to one side, 2 beats to the other), leaving the last measure for the turning around.
Chorus 1, Part A
1-4: Each line does a single hey
Chorus 1, Part B
1-4: Man 2 does a single hey with couple 3 as woman 2 does the same with couple 1
Chorus 1, Part C
1-4: Man 2 does a single hey with couple 1 as woman 2 does the same with couple 3
Note: the manuscript says "they shall dance their hays, all ways, as you may 3: 4: or 5 times, and then all into you places after you have dancd it as many ways as you can". I've used the 4th part of the Playford version above, but if the music gets played a few more times, more versions of the hey could well be done.
One easy addition would be to have the men hey in zig-zag formation, and then the women do the same.
Part 2
Verse 2, Part A
1: Lines facing partners and holding hands, lead [a double] toward each other
2: Fall back [a double], drop hands
3: Man 2 and woman 2 will each congee (bow) to the person on their right
4: Man 2 and woman 2 will each congee (bow) to the person on their left, and then everyone will turn their back on their partner (in no time)
Verse 2, Part B
1: Lines holding hands, go [a double] away from each other
2: Fall back [a double], drop hands
3: Man 2 and woman 2 will each congee (bow) to the person on their left
4: Man 2 and woman 2 will each congee (bow) to the person on their right, and then everyone turn to face their partner again (in no time)
Note: If the congeeing and turning have been changed above, do the same change here since it is otherwise identical (as requested by the manuscript)
Chorus 2, Part A
1-4: Each line forms a circle and goes around [for two doubles] one way, and then back around the other way
Chorus 2, Part B
1-4: Man 2 forms a circle with couple 3, woman 2 forms a circle with couple 1, and they go around [for two doubles] one way, and then back around the other way
Chorus 2, Part C
1-4: Man 2 forms a circle with couple 1, woman 2 forms a circle with couple 3, and they go around [for two doubles] one way, and then back around the other way
Note: If there are more ways to turn these six people in groups of three (the manuscript prescribes sets of 3), then try them to another repeat of the music!
One easy possibility is to have the men circle and the women circle, either independently, or at the same time (with some repositioning, of course).
Comparison to the Playford version (1st to 8th editions)
This is one of those direct ancestor dances - clearly a pre-curser to Playford's Greenwood, but not quite the same dance if only because it is not quite as complex. Playford's version is replete with sets and turns, while this one uses congeeing, and extra spinning, to use up the music.
I wonder, though, whether the dance community added the extra chorus actions (siding, arming, and the extra-fancy zig-zag hey), or whether Playford wanted to jazz up the dance when he copied it over for his manuscript?
Two more observations: first, my take on Playford's Greenwood, from long before I ever knew about other manuscript sources, was that it was a circle dance being done in a line, what with everyone ending up dancing with everyone else and all. Turns out I was right, considering the instructions in this manuscript!
And second, I find it interesting that in complicating (or at least, extending) the dance, Playford not only added 4 parts (and a trailing coda of a chorus-less verse), but he changed the pattern of the dance for the final two parts.
Whereas the previous 4 parts had 3 repeats of the music to get each possible pairing (or triad-ing) to dance the figure together, the last two change tactics to isolate the genders, meaning that the music is only played twice. I'm sure it means something ... just not sure what ...