Nonesuch (version 2 - pure(r))

Nonesuch (version 2)
for a line of four numbered couples
Reconstructed by Dafydd Cyhoeddwr to be closer to the source
Note:  this reconstruction only uses Nonesuch as a reference, ignoring A la mode de France
Music: Playford Re-Play’d (not enough repeats, of course) - 15 repeats are required, among others
Part 1, Verse 1
1: Couples take inside hands, face up the hall; lead up a double
2: Fall back a double
3&4: That again, face your partner
5&6: Set and turn, left
7&8: Set and turn, right
Part 1, Chorus 1
Please note that in this chorus, everyone progresses up and back down the line following normal "virus" dance conventions.
The instruction "Doe thus to the last" is a code for progression with the real question being whether it means exactly what it says (i.e. invert the line) or go all the way down and back up.
In order for the dance to work properly, everyone needs to be back where they started at the end of the chorus.
1: Moving couple(s) (couple one to start) meet a double
2: Slip down between and just past the next couple in line (couple two to start)
3: Turn outwards (down the line) in a 3/4 circle to face the person on your own side
4: Push this person back a double into the place you just came from (inverting the couples)
5: Still keeping both hands, turn this person so their back is into the center of the line (i.e. so the inactive pair (couple 2 to start) end up back to back)
6: Turn them back the opposite way so that they end up back in their new places
7&8: Turn your partner all the way around
Repeat Figure 1 as follows:  
Couples 1 and 3;   
Couples 2 and 3, and 1 and 4;
Couples 2 and 4;
Couples 3 and 4, and 2 and 1;
Couples 3 and 1;
Couples 4 and 1, and 3 and 2;
Couples 4 and 2;
And finally, couples 4 and 3.
Part 2, Verse 2
1&2: Side left with your partner (double forward to line up right shoulders, double back)
3&4: Side right with your partner (double forward to line up left shoulders, double back)
5&6: Set and turn, left
7&8: Set and turn, right
Part 2, Chorus 2
1: Man 1 slip/walk a double into the center of the line, slightly above his starting position, facing down the line
2: Woman 1 slip/walk a double into the center to face her partner (facing up the line)
3: Man 2 slip/walk a double into the center facing down
4: Woman 2 slip/walk a double into the center facing up
5: Man 3 slip/walk a double into the center facing down
6: Woman 3 slip/walk a double into the center facing up
7: Man 4 slip/walk a double into the center facing down
8: Woman 4 slip/walk a double into the center facing up (completing the line)
Part 3, Verse 3
1&2: Arm left with your partner
3&4:  Arm right with your partner
5: Everyone take four slips to the left
6: Everyone take four slips to the right (to line up again)
7: Everyone take four more slips to the right
8: Everyone take four last slips to the left (to line up again)
Part 3, Chorus 3
1: Man 1 slip/walk a double back to his place at the side of the set
2: Woman 1 slip/walk a double back to her place at the side of the set
3: Man 2 slip/walk a double back to his place
4: Woman 2 slip/walk a double back to her place
5: Man 3 slip/walk a double back to his place
6: Woman 3 slip/walk a double back to her place
7: Man 4 slip/walk a double back to his place
8: Woman 4 slip/walk a double back to her place
Part 4
This will be a single, handed hey starting with right hands
1: Couples 1 and 4, men 2 and 3, women 2 and 3, take right hands; changes places
2-8: Continue the hey, alternating hands, crossing over at the top and bottom as required.  Couple 1 will go all the way down and back up in the single repeat of the music that this version takes
It takes 15 repeats of the music to do the dance like this.
Nonsuch Palace was possibly the greatest of King Henry VIII's building projects.  It was built in Surrey, started April 22, 1538 and mostly finished by 1541 (though construction continued for a few more years).
The name "Nonsuch" was given to it during construction because it was claimed there was no such palace elsewhere equal to its magnificence.
It was destroyed in 1682 or so by the Countess of Castlemaine, mistress of Charles II (the building materials were sold to pay gambling debts).