Juvenile Justice Research and Reform Lab

Juvenile Justice Research and Reform Lab Personnel

Director, Juvenile Justice Research and Reform Lab

Naomi Goldstein

E-mail: neg23@drexel.edu     A link to her curriculum vitae

Naomi Goldstein, Ph.D., is Professor of Psychology, Co-Director of the JD/PhD Program in Law and Psychology, and Director of the Juvenile Justice Research and Reform Lab at Drexel University; she is also a Stoneleigh Foundation Fellow. Dr. Goldstein collaborates with community stakeholders to use social science research to improve juvenile justice policy and practice. For nearly 20 years, her work has focused on the role of adolescent development in legal decision making and legal outcomes. She currently focuses on cross-systems work to dismantle the school-to-prison pipeline, reform juvenile probation systems, protect youths' rights during police questioning, and reduce racial and ethnic disparities within the justice system.

Dr. Goldstein has served as primary investigator, co-investigator, and consultant on federal, state, and foundation grants and has authored or co-authored more than 60 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters, forensic assessment tools, a juvenile justice treatment manual, and several books on juvenile justice. Additionally, Dr. Goldstein has authored, co-authored, and contributed to national and state juvenile justice legislation, policy reports, and amicus briefs to the U.S. Supreme Court. Dr. Goldstein has served on the editorial boards of multiple academic journals, strategic planning and research advisory committees of national organizations, and numerous juvenile justice work groups and policy committees.

Dr. Goldstein received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst and completed her clinical internship at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. She obtained her B.A. in Psychology from Wesleyan University.

Senior Policy Advisor

Kevin J. Bethel, MS is a retired Deputy Police Commissioner in the Philadelphia Police Department, the fourth-largest police department in the nation, with over 6,600 sworn personnel. Prior to his retirement in January 2016, Mr. Bethel commanded Patrol Operations for the entire city. This appointment included oversight of the 21 Patrol Districts, Neighborhood Services Unit, Philadelphia School District Police, and Community Relations Unit. Previous assignments throughout his 29 years of service with the Philadelphia Police Department include positions within the Special Investigative Bureau, Narcotics Strike Force, Narcotics Field Unit, Narcotics Intelligence Investigative Unit, and the Internal Affairs Division, as well as Commanding Officer of the 17th Police District.

Mr. Bethel has done extensive work in the juvenile justice field, most recently working to develop a School Diversion Program within the Philadelphia School System. The program diverts first time, low-level juvenile offenders from justice involvement by utilizing programs within the Department of Human Services. In its first year, the program reduced the number of school arrests by 54 percent.

Mr. Bethel also serves on various committees and boards in the field of juvenile justice. He testified before the President's 21st Century Task Force, co-chaired by Police Commissioner Charles Ramsey, on the need for a concerted effort by law enforcement leaders to address the school-to-prison pipeline across the nation. He currently serves on the Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency Disproportionate Minority Contact Subcommittee and is a former member of the National Academy of Sciences Committee on Law and Justice.

He is also a member of the Youth Violence Collaborative and Youth Engagement for the National League of Cities Collaboration, a member of the Philadelphia Juvenile Detention Alternative Initiative, a faculty member for the International Association of Chiefs of Police Juvenile Justice Leadership Institute, and a regular lecturer on school diversion and racial and ethnic disparities at Georgetown University.

Mr. Bethel has received numerous accolades and awards throughout his 29 years in the Philadelphia Police Department, including his selection as the recipient of the Philadelphia Daily News 2008 Fencl Award, bestowed upon a police officer who brings a unique blend of courage, integrity, and determination to the job.

Mr. Bethel holds a Masters Degree in Public Safety from St. Joseph's University and a Bachelor of Science Degree in Criminal Justice from Chestnut Hill College. He is also a member of the Chestnut Hill Libris Society, an honor given to graduates of the College who distinguish themselves in their personal and professional lives while exemplifying the College motto: Fides. Caritas. Scientia. Faith. Charity. Knowledge.

Data and Evaluation Manager

Naomi Goldstein

E-mail: renakreimer@gmail.com

A link to her curriculum vitae

Rena Kreimer, MSW, is the Data and Evaluation Manager for Drexel University's Juvenile Justice Research and Reform Lab. She manages the acquisition, analysis, and dissemination of data related to the federally-funded evaluation of the Philadelphia Police School Diversion Program. Kreimer facilitates communication between diverse stakeholders and research partners to ensure effective grant reporting, data sharing, and program analysis.

Prior to joining the Juvenile Justice Research and Reform Lab, she coordinated Philadelphia's Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative for the City of Philadelphia's Department of Human Services and Family Court, where she facilitated multiple reform projects to improve detention and juvenile justice practices. She previously gained experience in child-serving and justice systems with positions at the ACLU of Southern California, the Field Center for Children's Policy, Practice and Research, Center for Mental Health Policy and Services Research, and Juvenile Law Center.

Kreimer has served as a professional grant reviewer, grant writer, and peer reviewer for the OJJDP Journal of Juvenile Justice and the Department of Education.

Kreimer received her Masters in Social Work from the University of Pennsylvania, and a BA in Psychology from Pitzer College.

Research Coordinator

Naomi Goldstein

E-mail: tkl33@drexel.edu

A link to her curriculum vitae

TuQuynh Le is the Research Coordinator for the evaluation of the Philadelphia Police School Diversion Program. Her background working with sexual assault survivors, with homeless individuals, and as an EMT fostered an interest in working on issues of institutional and systemic inequality for marginalized populations, including the school-to-prison pipeline.

TuQuynh earned a B.S. in Microbiology from the University of Maryland, College Park and a M.S in Medical Science from Boston University School of Medicine.

Postdoctoral Fellow

Joseph Hiroyuki Gardella, M.S., ABD (Ph.D. expected 2018), is a Postdoctoral Fellow in Drexel University’s Juvenile Justice Research and Reform Lab and a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Pennsylvania’s Consortium for Policy Research in Education. Joseph works with school and community stakeholders using systems change science approaches to foster positive minority youth development and behavioral outcomes.

For example, in the Juvenile Justice Research and Reform Lab, he uses translational science approaches to develop and deliver trainings for school police officers as part of an initiative to broaden the delivery of Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports (PBIS) and trauma-sensitive approaches across challenging school contexts. In the Consortium for Policy Research in Education, he is developing and implementing a practitioner-led community-based participatory action research improvement science process for low-cost evidence-based school improvement. Specific intervention work includes restorative practices and reducing racial bias in behavioral discipline.

Prior to joining the lab, Joseph was a graduate student in the Community Research and Action Ph.D. program at Vanderbilt University. He received his M.S. from Vanderbilt University and B.A. from the University of Rochester.

PhD Students

Elizabeth Gale-Bentz

Liz Gale-Bentz is a sixth-year doctoral student in the clinical psychology program at Drexel University and the lab's Director of Juvenile Probation Reform Initiatives. Her clinical and research interests in forensic psychology include juvenile probation, program development and evaluation, and juvenile justice policy reform. Liz received her B.A. in Psychology and African American Studies from the University of Virginia in May 2010.

E-mail: elizabeth.galebentz@gmail.com     A link to her curriculum vitae

Keisha April

Keisha April is a fourth-year doctoral student in the clinical psychology program at Drexel University. Her clinical and research interests in forensic psychology include racial and ethnic disparities in the criminal justice system, with a focus on policing; legal attitude and belief formation; and justice policy and reform. As an attorney, she has worked with both juvenile and adult criminal defendants and advocated for the rights of falsely-convicted prisoners while working at the Innocence Project Clinic. Keisha earned an A.B. in Psychology and minors in East Asian and African American Studies from Princeton University in 2010. She earned a J.D. with concentrations in Criminal Law and Family Law from the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law in 2013.

E-mail: keisha.april@gmail.com     A link to her curriculum vitae

Mina Ratkalkar

Mina Ratkalkar is a fourth-year doctoral student in the clinical psychology program at Drexel University. Her clinical and research interests include re-entry, crossover youth, sexuality issues among justice-involved populations, and gender-responsive interventions for women and girls. Mina is a licensed clinical social worker (LCSW) and mitigation specialist who advocates for individuals who were sentenced to mandatory life without parole as children. Mina earned her B.S. in Clinical Psychology and Community Health from Tufts University in 2009. She earned her M.S. in Social Work from Columbia University in 2012 and a M.S. in Criminology and Criminal Justice from Florida Atlantic University in 2016.

E-mail: mina.ratkalkar@gmail.com     A link to her curriculum vitae

Jeanne McPhee

Jeanne McPhee is a second-year doctoral student in the clinical psychology program at Drexel University. Her clinical and research interests in forensic psychology include juvenile probation; the relationship between gender and race in the criminal justice system; program development and evaluation; and juvenile justice policy and reform. Jeanne received her B.A. in Psychology from Wesleyan University in 2013.

E-mail: mcphee.jeanne@gmail.com     A link to her curriculum vitae

JD/PhD Students

Suraji Wagage

Suraji Wagage is a seventh-year student in the Law-Psychology program with Drexel University's School of Law. Her clinical and research interests in forensic psychology include juvenile justice practices and policy and examining how mental health, trauma, race, and gender impact interactions with the justice system and outcomes. She is also interested in assessing ways in which policy change can address racial and gender disparities within the justice system and society at large. She earned an Sc.B. in Cognitive Neuroscience and an A.B. in Literary Arts from Brown University in 2009.

E-mail: srw69@drexel.edu     A link to her curriculum vitae

Jennica Janssen

Jennica Janssen is a fifth-year student in the Law-Psychology program with Drexel University's School of Law. Her clinical and research interests are in the collateral consequences for justice-involved youth, juvenile sex offender registration and notification laws, online dating violence, juvenile and adult forensic psychology, and alternative sentencing that includes a mental health treatment component. She has served as a legal intern at Juvenile Law Center and in Philadelphia's prostitution diversion court, as a Marriage and Family Therapy intern in a mental health diversion court, an intensive outpatient program in a hospital setting, and an outpatient clinic, assisting adolescents struggling with substance abuse. Jennica earned her B.S. in Psychobiology from the University of California, Los Angeles, in June 2010; she earned her M.S. in Clinical Psychology and a Gerontology Certificate from Notre Dame de Namur University in 2013.

E-mail: jennicamjanssen@gmail.com     A link to her curriculum vitae

Stephanie Singer

Stephanie Singer is a fourth-year student in the Law-Psychology program with Drexel University's School of Law. Her clinical and research interests are in forensic psychology, particularly false confession likelihood, efforts to address disproportionate minority contact (DMC), and diversion initiatives for both adults and juveniles. She earned a B.A. from the College of the Holy Cross in 2011 and an M.S. in Psychology from Drexel University in 2015.

E-mail: scsing11@gmail.com     A link to her curriculum vitae

Madelena Rizzo

Madelena Rizzo Madelena Rizzo is a third-year student in the Law-Psychology program with Drexel University's School of Law. Her clinical and research interests are in rehabilitation programs in prisons, alternatives to incarceration, and criminal and juvenile justice system reform. She is particularly interested in reentry after incarceration, including ways to reduce recidivism and increase positive outcomes. Madelena earned her B.A. in Psychology from Bowdoin College in 2014.

E-mail: madelenarizzo@gmail.com     A link to her curriculum vitae

Research Assistants

Bridget Keech, Kate Oliver, Emily Jarin,
Elizabeth Calio, Winnie Chan, Kaya Gravesande, and Teyanie Watson-Harris.


If you would like to be a research assistant, contact Jeanne.