Study Guide: COM 690/400 - Communication for Civic Engagement


Chapter 1


1. Why, according to Palczewski et al., is rhetoric  important to civic society?

2. What does it mean to say that rhetoric is symbolic action?


3. What does it mean to say that rhetoric is constitutive?

4. In the context of rhetoric what is identification?

5. What is the relationship between rhetoric and social reality?

6. How did the ancient Greeks use rhetoric?

7. What three types of rhetorical proofs did Aristotle identify?

8. What kinds of human interaction arises from the use of rhetoric in civic engagement?

9. What are the various persuasive purposes on the persuasive continuum?

10. What is the relationship among rhetoric, power, ideology, and hegemony?

 

Chapter 2

 

1. What are the differences between semiotics and the correspondence theory of language?

2. What are the differences between a sign’s denotations and its connotations?

3. What is the linguistic relativity theory?

4. What is a terministic screen, and how does it function as a public vocabulary?

5. What are the four key elements of a public vocabulary?

6. What is the difference between discursive symbolism and presentational symbolism?

7. What is resignification?

8. What are two types of doublespeak?

9. What are truncated passives?

10. In what ways are people, places, and topics subject to silence?

 

Chapter 4

 

1. What are two senses of the word argument and what are their roles in a democracy?

2. What is the difference between a syllogism and an enthymeme?

3. What four types of claim are possible in a formal argument?

4. What is the data in an argument?

5. What is a warrant in an argument?

6. What is a backing in an argument?

7. What are the qualifier and the rebuttal in an argument?

8. What is an argument field?

9. In the context of formal arguments what is the difference between presumption and the burden of proof?

10. What are the three spheres of argument?

 

Chapter 5

1. What two types of memory do narratives form?

2. How can narratives teach cultural values?

3. How can narratives imply causation?

4. How can narratives engage interest?

5. What are the two common aesthetic characteristics of narratives?

6. What is meant by a narrative’s authorial intent?

7. What is the relationship between narratives and empirical truth?

8. What is meant by the social truth of a narrative?

9. What is the difference between narrative fidelity and narrative probability?

10. What is the difference between tragic and comic frames?


Chapter 6

1. What is meant by the term rhetorical persona?

2. What are the various facets of a rhetorical persona?

3. What are the three dimensions of ethos?

4. What are three kinds of role that rhetors can play?

5. What is the difference between strategic essentialism and intersectionality as they apply to the notion of identity?

6. What types and degrees of social power can rhetors possess?

7. What is authority?

8. What might constrain a rhetor’s authority to perform a role?

9. What is image?

10. What are the characteristics of image?


Chapter 7

1. How does the element of audience distinguish rhetoric from other forms of communication?

2. What complicates the identity of the audience who hears a speaker’s message?

3. What is the rhetorical audience of a message?

4. What are three rhetorical techniques for adapting a message to an audience?

5. What does it mean to say that in some situations the audience must be created?

6. Who is the first persona?

7. Who is the second persona?

8. Who is the third persona?

9. Who is the fourth persona?

10. Who is the eavesdropping audience?



Chapter 8

1. What is entailed by Palczewski’s assertion, “Communication does not occur in a vacuum?”

2. What are Aristotle’s three situational classifications for rhetoric?

3. What is the role of exigence in a rhetorical situation?

4. What is the role of audience in a rhetorical situation?

5. What is the role of constraints in a rhetorical situation?

6. What is meant by a fitting response to a rhetorical situation?

7. What does it mean to say “rhetoric constructs the situation?”

8. What does Palczewski mean by the assertion, “A synergistic relationship emerges between

rhetoric and situation?”

9. What makes up the context of a rhetorical act?

10. What are four ways in which a rhetor can respond to a rhetorical situation?

 

Chapter 9

1. What is the public sphere?

2. What are the characteristics of ideal public discourse?

3. What are the differences between weak publics and strong publics?

4. What are hybrid publics?

5. What are the differences between a dominant public and a counter-public?

6. What are the differences between enclaved publics and oscillating publics?

7. What is the relationship between identity and a counter-public?

8. What is meant by the phrase “transnationalization of the public sphere?”

9. What is the relationship between publics and the economy?

10. What is the role of digital technology in enabling publics?