Chapter 1

1. How can a speech be a collaborative creation?

2. What relevance do writing, conversation, and performance have to public speaking?

3. What are four common misconceptions about public speaking?

4. What are the four stages of skill learning?

Chapter 3

1. What are some ethical dimensions of public speaking?

2. What ethical guidelines apply to the integrity of ideas?

3. What are some ethical implications in our choices of language?

4. What are some ethical implications in the use of emotional appeals?

5. What are some persuasive techniques that may "short-circuit an audience's rational processes?"

Chapter 4

1. What positive effect can fear have on a public speaker?

2. How can "reconceptualizing the role of the audience" help a speaker to deal with fear?

3. What are some others ways of dealing with the fear of public speaking?

Chapter 5

1. What are the four phases of speech preparation?

2. Which aspects of speech preparation are private and which can be collaborative?

Chapter 6

1. What are some personal bases for selecting a speech topic?

2. What are some criteria for an appropriate speech topic?

3. What are the three general purposes for speaking publicly?

4. What are some characteristics of a good specific purpose?

5. What is a thesis statement?

Chapter 7

1. Why is it important to know your audience?

2. What are some ways of finding out about your audience?

3. What are the demographic characteristics of your classroom audience?

4. Why are an audience's beliefs, attitudes, and values important to know?

Chapter 8

1. What are some guidelines for effectively researching your topic?

2. What are some good human resources for researching your topic?

3. How should you keep track of your resources?

Chapter 9-10

1. What are the main points of a speech?

2. What does it mean for main points to be unified?

3. What does it mean for main points to be mutually exclusive?

4. What does it mean for main points to have parallel structure?

5. How should main points be written?

6. What are five ways in which main points can be arranged?

Chapter 11

1. What are the characteristics of a full sentence outline?

2. What does it mean to write main points that are concise and parallel?

Chapter 12

1. What determines the type of transitional devices used in the body of a speech?

2. What are internal previews and summaries?

Chapter 13

1. What are the three basic tasks of an introduction?

2. What are some ways of getting the audience's attention?

3. How can you establish a relationship with your audience?

4. How can you give your audience a perspective on your topic?

Chapter 14

1. What is logical closure?

2. What is psychological closure?

3. What are some guidelines for crafting the last sentence of your speech?

Chapter 15

1. What are six ways to define unfamiliar terms in your speech?

2. What are the differences between actual and hypothetical examples?

3. How can you evaluate statistical evidence?

4. What are some guidelines for selecting and using expert testimony?

Chapter 16

1. What is induction?

2. When is an inductive leap justified?

3. What is deduction?

4. What are some guidelines for using deduction?

5. What is causal reasoning?

6. What are some guidelines for using causal reasoning?

7. What is an analogy?

8. What are some guidelines for using analogies?

9. What are some transitional devices that suggest induction, deduction, causal reasoning, and analogy?

Chapter 17

1. What is the difference between an oral and a written style?

2. What is the difference between literal and figurative language?

3. What is the difference between abstract and concrete words?

4. What is the difference between slang, jargon, and substandard language?

5. What is inclusive language?

Chapter 18

1. What are some factors to consider when work towards sustaining your audience's attention throughout your speech?

2. What are some risks inherent in using humor?

Chapter 19

1. What are the four components of credibility?

2. How can you establish your credibility before your speech?

3. How can the content of your speech enhance your credibility?

4. How can delivery affect one's credibility?

Chapter 20

1. How does Maslow's hierarchy of needs apply to public speaking?

2. What are some contemporary American values?

3. What is the difference between core, authority, and peripheral values?

Chapter 21

1. How many main points can the average person comprehend at one time?

2. What are signposts?

3. What is the role of acronyms in presenting information?

4. What is the difference between an example and an analogy?

Chapter 22

1. What are the four general goals of persuasive speeches?

2. What does it mean to say that inquiry should precede advocacy?

3. What are the differences between propositions of fact, value, and policy?

4. What are stock issues?

5. How should a speaker deal with a favorable audience? a neutral audience? an unfavorable audience?

6. What are the five stages of the motivated sequence?

7. When should speakers present their strongest points?

8. What should a speaker do about opposing arguments?

Chapter 33

1. What is the purpose of an evocative speech?

2. What is the ceremonial speaker's responsibility to the subject of the speech?

3. What is the ceremonial speaker's responsibility to the audience of the speech?

Chapter 32

1. What are seven dimensions of public speaking contexts that can be analyzed along continua?

2. What is a PSR?

3. What is the difference between a symposium, a panel, a forum, and a debate?

4. What are the responsibilities of the chair of a group presentation?

Chapter 23

1. What are the three modes of delivery?

2. Why is extemporaneous delivery preferred?

3. When is a manuscript speech appropriate?

Chapter 24

1. What are the goals of the early, middle, and final practice sessions?

2. Compare the three means of feedback: live listeners, audio or video tape, and mirrors.

3. What are the differences between a preparation outline and speech notes?

Chapter 25

1. What are some examples of articulation problems?

2. What are vocalized pauses?

3. What is the difference between volume, pitch, tempo, and vocal quality?

Chapter 26

1. When is movement appropriate for a speaker?

2. What are some ineffective uses of hands during a speech?

3. Why is eye contact with the audience important?

4. What role can facial expressions play in a speech?

Chapter 27

1. When are visual aids appropriate in a speech?

2. What are some important guidelines for crafting visual aids?

3. What are some important guidelines for using visual aids?

Chapter 28

1. How should you respond to an audience who is bored, uninformed, well informed, or heterogeneous?

2. What are some effective ways to deal with unintended distractions?

3. What are some effective ways to deal with hecklers?

Chapter 29

1. What are some guidelines for conducting a question-and-answer session?

2. How should you respond to questioners who try to wrest control of the session for their own purposes?

 

 

Penrose

[Click here for reading: Penrose.]

1. What is the speaker's purpose in a research conference presentation?>

 

2. What are the differences between oral and written presentations of scientific research?>

 

3. What is the general structure of an oral conference presentation?

 

4. What is the preferred method of delivery for an oral conference presentation?

 

5. What are some guidelines for adjusting the vocal and physical aspects of delivery?

 

6. What are some guidelines for using graphics in an oral conference presentation?

 

7. What is a research poster?

 

Campbell

Campbell, K., Saroya I. Follener, and Guy Shane, (1998) "Preferred Strategies for responding to hostile questions in environmental public hearings," Management Communication Quarterly, 11, 3, 401-421.

1. Describe the type of discourse that Campbell analyzes.
 

2. Why is Campbell critical of the current discussion about this discourse?


3. Describe Campbell's theoretical base.


4. Why does Campbell think that speech act theory is appropriate for analyzing public meeting discussions?


5. What are the five strategies that speech act theory recommends for responding to hostile questions?


6. What conclusions does Campbell reach regarding these strategies?