Draft 1: Instruction Writing

Directions:

1. Consider some of the innovations in the tools and products of your area of study (e.g., scientific and industrial test equipment, business software programs, health care devices, consumer electronics, etc.).

2. Identify some unique key words for these items, and use them to search the U.S. Patent Office website to locate an original patent.

3. After studying this document, consider these questions:

4. Using the answers to these questions and following the guidelines for drafting instructions on pages 564 to 566 in your textbook, write a rough draft of an instruction document that includes introduction, body, and conclusion.

5. Set your draft aside for 24 hours; then come back to it, and revise it, using the checklist on page 574 of your textbook.

6. Bring four copies of your document to class. 


Project 1: Instruction Writing  

Directions:
 
1. Using the feedback you received from your peer reviewers, revise the second draft of your instructions.

2. Revise it according to the guidelines on page 574.

3. Attach a memo to me about your document in which you explain the decisions you made about the project's format, content, style, and tone. Include in the memo the source ( i.e., patent number) of the information about the product.

4. Email me your project as an MS-Word document, using the following filename convention: X310-00YpZ.doc, where:

X = your last name
Y = course section number (either 3 or 4)
Z = project number

So if I were submitting project 1 in section 4, the file name would be: souder310-004p1.doc

 

Draft 2: Proposal

Directions:

1. Take some time to familiarize yourself with the specialty journals in your major field of study. One way to assemble a fairly complete list is to search the on-line catalog at Penn's library for journals on a keyword like entomology. Then, review the journals available in Hagerty Library relevant to your major, and identify one that is missing from the collection (this shouldn't be difficult).

2. Using the principles of persuasion in proposals on pages 437-440, craft a strategy for proposing the purchase of the missing journal. The proposal should call for a specific action and be addressed to a specific reader with the authority to approve, recommend, or fund the proposal.

3. Following the guidelines on pages 440-446, draft your proposal. The document should consist of the following:

4. After a day or so return to your draft, and revise it according to the checklist on page 452.

5. Bring four copies of your proposal to class.

 

Project 2 : Proposal

Directions: 

1. Based on the feedback you received from your peer reviewer, revise and draft a final version.

2. Attach a memo to me about your proposal in which you explain the decisions you made about the document's format, content, style, and tone.

3.  Email me your project as an MS-Word document, using the following filename convention: X310-00YpZ.doc, where:

X = your last name
Y = course section number (either 3 or 4)
Z = project number

So if I were submitting project 2 in section 4, the file name would be: souder310-004p2.doc

 

Draft 3: Correspondence
 
Directions:
 
1. Take a moment to consider the products or services that directly or indirectly result from the efforts of people who have majored in your field of study. Select three or four of these products, and find examples that have been formally recalled by their manufacturers. To find such products, search the following web sites:

Now imagine that you are a member of the team that initially designed and prototyped this recalled product.

Imagine further that after your design went into production, you discovered evidence of a defect that would cause harm to humans. You present this evidence to your immediate supervisor, but she squashes it, saying any interruptions in production at this point will cost the company millions of dollars in lost revenue and will damage your department's reputation.

Using the information about the product's recall, an understanding of the company's mission and code of conduct, and your own awareness of the political and ethical implications of your actions, write a letter to a higher-up in the company that "blows the whistle" on this situation.

2. Address your letter to the specific person in the company who is most likely to be able to act on your message. See the company's website or Hagerty's business information databases.

3. Using the guidelines described on pages 371-376 of your textbook for writing claims and "bad news" letters, sketch the points you would make in writing the proposed letter. For a helpful tutorial on the specific issue of appropriate tone in correspondence, visit Ze Frank's site on communication.
 
4. Write a rough draft of your letter without worrying too much about spelling and grammar.
 
5. After a day or so, return to your draft, and revise it according to the checklists on pages 384-385.
 
6. Type your second draft according to one of the formats on pages 369-376.
 
7. Bring four copies of your letter to class. 

 

Project 3 : Correspondence

Directions:
 
1. Using the feedback you received from your peer reviewers, revise the second draft of your letter.

2. Revise it according to the guidelines on pages 384-385.

3. Type your second draft according to one of the formats on pages 369-376.

4. Attach a memo to me about your letter in which you explain the decisions you made about the letter's format, content, style, and tone. Include in the memo the source of the information about the product recall.

5. Email me your project as an MS-Word document, using the following filename convention: X310-00YpZ.doc, where:

X = your last name
Y = course section number (either 3 or 4)
Z = project number

So if I were submitting project 3 in section 4, the file name would be: souder310-004p3.doc

 

Draft 4: Report

Directions:

1. Reflect on the experiences you've had in your major field of study so far, and identify any recent significant projects, experiments, field trips, or product/service trials.

2. Select one of the above situations as the basis for writing a report.

3. Following the guidelines relevant to the type of report you have selected, draft your document. Your report should include content and form appropriate to the type of report.

4. After a day or so return to your draft, and revise it according to the checklist on page 475 or 496.

5. Bring four copies of your report to class.

  

Project 4: Report

Directions:

1. Based on the feedback you received during the presentation of your report, revise and draft a final version.

2. Attach a memo to me about your report in which you explain the decisions you made about the document's format, content, style, and tone.

3. Email me your project as an MS-Word document, using the following filename convention: X310-00YpZ.doc, where:

X = your last name
Y = course section number
Z = project number

So if I were submitting project 4 in section 4, the file name would be: souder310-004p4.doc