Dominican Republic
 

Map of Jamaica

 

Flag of Dominican Republic
National name: República Dominicana

Area: 18,815 sq mi (48,730 sq km)

Population (2004 est.): 8,833,634 (growth rate: 1.3%); birth rate: 23.6/1000; infant mortality rate: 33.3/1000; life expectancy: 67.6; density per sq mi: 470

Capital: Santo Domingo

Monetary unit: Dominican Peso

Languages: Spanish

Ethnicity/race: white 16%, black 11%, mixed 73%

Religion: Roman Catholic 95%

Literacy rate: 85% (2003 est.)

Natural resources: nickel, bauxite, gold, silver. Exports: $5.524 billion (f.o.b., 2003 est.): ferronickel, sugar, gold, silver, coffee, cocoa, tobacco, meats, consumer goods. Imports: $7.911 billion (f.o.b., 2003 est.): foodstuffs, petroleum, cotton and fabrics, chemicals and pharmaceuticals. Major trading partners: U.S., Canada, UK, Venezuela, Mexico, Spain.

International disputes: despite efforts to control illegal migration, destitute Haitians continue to cross into the Dominican Republic.

Netherlands, Trinidad and Tobago, Japan.

Member of Commonwealth of Nations

 

 

Symbolism of Flag

The blue and red are from the flag of Haiti, which once controlled the Dominican Republic. The blue represents liberty; red for the fire and blood of the independence struggle and the white cross is a symbol of sacrifice and faith.

 

Geography

The Dominican Republic in the West Indies occupies the eastern two-thirds of the island of Hispaniola, which it shares with Haiti. Its area equals that of Vermont and New Hampshire combined. Duarte Peak, at 10,417 ft (3,175 m), is the highest point in the West Indies.

 

Government

Representative democracy.

 

National Anthem

Brave men of Quisqueya,
Let us sing with strong feeling
And let us show to the world
Our invincible, glorious banner.
Hail, O people who, strong and intrepid,
Launched into war and went to death!
Under a warlike menace of death,
You broke your chains of slavery.

No country deserves to be free
If it is an indolent and servile slave,
If the call does not grow loud within it,
Tempered by a virile heroism.
But the brave and indomitable Quisqueya
Will always hold its head high,
For if it were a thousand times enslaved,
It would a thousand times regain freedom.