Competitions

Competitions Designed By Daniel M. Lofaro

All events listed below were designed and written by Daniel M. Lofaro. All of the competitions below are designed to enforce team work and critical thinking skills. The target audience of each of these competitions ranges from 6th grade students to adults.



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DASL 2010 Indoor Aerial Robotics Competition "IARC 2010" (April 2010)

This year's annual Indoor Aerial Robotics Competition sponsored by the Drexel Autonomous Systems Lab (DASL), hosted by Rowan University, will focus on unmanned equipment pickup/drop off and target tracking as it has to do with UAVs (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles). The competition will consist of the three parts listed in the Rules section below. Note: This competition is similar to IARC 2009 with the main difference being the requirement to only use autonomous control for the vehicles.

For the 2010 IARC Rules please Click Here

For more information about DASL Click Here


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DASL 2009 Indoor Aerial Robotics Competition "IARC 2009" (March 2009)

This year's annual Indoor Aerial Robotics Competition sponsored by the Drexel Autonomous Systems Lab (DASL) will focus on unmanned equipment pickup/drop off and target tracking as it has to do with UAVs (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles). The competition will consist of the three parts listed in the Rules section below.

For the 2009 IARC Rules please Click Here

For more information about DASL Click Here


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Drexel University CoE Engineers Week 15th Annual Egg Drop Competition (Febuary 2009)

International super spy, James Egg, also known as 00E (double-oh-ee), is being pursued by his arch rival, Dr. Spatula. James Egg commandeered a helicopter in an attempt to escape the foul flipping of Dr. Spatula. Soon after takeoff, Dr. Spatula took notice of James Egg’s escape and is now aiming to shoot down the helicopter. James Egg is forced to bail out of the helicopter. Luckily Q provided James Egg with a device that would allow him to survive the fall and quickly land in a safe area.

The objective of this competition is to create the device that Q gave to James Egg. The contraption should protect and guide James Egg, i.e. a Grade A large egg (egg will be provided), from the impact of a 34 foot drop into a specified landing zone. The landing area will be a 15 foot by 15 foot square with several different circular landing zones within it (see diagram in “Rules and Regulations” document). Each landing zone will have a given point value, the higher the point value the safer the landing zone will be. The contraption will be dropped in the center of the landing area by the retraction of a pin by a judge (see diagram in “Rules and Regulations” document). The team that has the most points at the end of the competition will win. Please see below for the rules and scoring for this event.

For more information Click Here


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Drexel HKN Popsicle Stick Bridge Contest (Winter 2008/2009)

The goal of this competition is to build the lease expensive bridge that can span a 12 inches gap, have a width of at least 3 inches, and hold a load at its center using only the materials listed below. The functioning bridge with the lowest materials cost wins. Please note that this competition is geared towards middle school students to teach them some of the basics of engineering.




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Drexel University CoE Engineers Week 14th Annual Egg Drop Competition (Febuary 2008)

The objective of this competition is to create a contraption that will protect and guide a Grade A large egg (egg will be provided) from the impact of a 28ft drop into a specified landing zone. The landing area will be a 15ft by 15ft square with several different circular landing zones within it, see diagram on other side. Each landing zones will have a given point value. The contraption will be dropped in the center of the landing area by the retraction of a pin by a judge, see diagram below. The team that has the most points at the end of the competition will win. Please see below for the rules and scoring for this event.

For more information Click Here


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3ed Annual IEEE Lego Robot Competition (Winter 2007/2008)

The competition will consist of three parts, two antonymous and once manual control. These three parts will be referred to as Maze, Race, and Sumo. Each team will be given on Lego Mindstorm RCX v1.0 kit that they will use, with no other parts, to construct a robot to complete the Maze, Race, and Sumo events. Each event the robot will be able to have it’s body reconfigured and its microcontroller reprogrammed. Each team will be given a minimum of five minutes between events reconfigure and reprogram their robots. We recommend showing up early so you can calibrate your sensors to the tables that are going to be used. Please note that at no time may the robot endanger damaging a contestant or spectator; it also must not risk physical damage on any parts of the robot.




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2nd Annual IEEE/ASME Lego Robot Competition (Fall 2007)

The competition will consist of three parts, two antonymous and once manual control. These three parts will be referred to as Maze, Bowling, and Sumo. Each team will be given on Lego Mindstorm RCX v1.0 kit that they will use, with no other parts, to construct a robot to complete the Maze, Bowling, and Sumo events. Each event the robot will be able to have it’s body reconfigured and its microcontroller reprogrammed. Each team will be given a minimum of five minutes between events reconfigure and reprogram their robots. We recommend showing up early so you can calibrate your sensors to the tables that are going to be used.




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First Annual IEEE Lego Robot Competition (Summer 2007)

The competition will consist of three parts, two antonymous and once manual control. These three parts will be referred to as Maze, Bowling, and Sumo. Each team will be given on Lego Mindstorm RCX v1.0 kit that they will use, with no other parts, to construct a robot to complete the Maze, Bowling, and Sumo events. Each event the robot will be able to have it’s body reconfigured and its microcontroller reprogrammed. Each team will be given a minimum of five minutes between events reconfigure and reprogram their robots. We recommend showing up early so you can calibrate your sensors to the tables that are going to be used.